Topic: China

Welcoming China to the Trans-Pacific Partnership

Huffington Post (July 9, 2013)

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When senior officials from the United States and China meet this week in Washington for a new round of their Strategic and Economic Dialogue, the U.S. has an excellent opportunity to overcome a deeply divisive economic issue complicating relations with Beijing by welcoming China’s participation in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). At the time President Obama… Read more »

Will the NSA Revelations Harm US-China Relations?

Huffington Post (June 18, 2013)

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The startling revelations about massive U.S. surveillance programs run by the National Security Agency emerged in early June just as President Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping were about to begin their informal summit meeting where cyberespionage was high on the agenda. While the Obama-Xi summit succeeded on several levels, the two leaders made no discernible progress on cyber… Read more »

Creating a New Model for U.S.-China Relations at the Obama-Xi Summit

Huffington Post (June 4, 2013)

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This week’s summit meeting between Chinese President Xi Jinping and President Barack Obama offers a historic opportunity to improve U.S.-China relations – but only if both sides frankly discuss the critical issues now dividing them and lay the basis for an ongoing process of mutual threat reduction. Fortunately, there is one major area where the two leaders… Read more »

American Diplomacy Rises Once Again in Northeast Asia

Huffington Post (April 30, 2013)

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Thanks to sure-footed diplomacy by Secretary of State John Kerry, South Korea’s President Park Geun-hye and Chinese leaders, the outrageous rhetorical threats of nuclear attack by North Korea have receded and, so far, Pyongyang has not carried out the two specific provocations it threatened – test launches of ballistic missiles and a fourth nuclear test…. Read more »

Cooperating With China to Contain North Korea

Huffington Post (April 7, 2012)

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After nearly two months of outrageous North Korean threats and high tension on the Korean peninsula, the United States intends to rely much more heavily on China to achieve core American security goals in Northeast Asia — maintaining stability while containing the threats from Pyongyang. In the face of real uncertainty about North Korea’s intentions… Read more »

After the Nuclear Test: Countering the Threat From North Korea

Huffington Post (February 12, 2013)

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China’s decision in late January to back the United States in expanding UN sanctions against North Korea underscores the value of improving U.S.-China relations in President Barack Obama’s second term and opens a new avenue for more effective diplomacy to counter Pyongyang’s weapons programs, following its nuclear test in flagrant violation of UN Security Council resolutions.

Kerry and Hagel Will Improve US Relations with China

Huffington Post (January 8, 2013)

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President Barack Obama’s appointment of John Kerry as secretary of state and Chuck Hagel as secretary of defense will likely bring a major improvement in U.S.-China relations during the administration’s second term. Both Kerry and Hagel support greater U.S. cooperation with China and favor a diplomatic resolution of conflicts between the two countries.

Seizing the opportunity to improve US–China relations

East Asia Forum (December 17th, 2012)

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President Barack Obama struck just the right note at the East Asia Summit in Cambodia when he called for restraint and the reduction of tensions arising from territorial disputes over small islands and energy resources in the East and South China Seas.

Those disputes could escalate to a confrontation between Japan, Vietnam or the Philippines with China that might draw in the United States and potentially lead to a wider military conflict.

Managing Instability on the Korean Peninsula

RealClear World (December 20, 2011)

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The death of North Korean leader Kim Jong-il gives rise to an urgent security issue in U.S.-China relations. Peace and stability in Northeast Asia now depend in large part on the ability of Washington, Seoul, and Beijing to diplomatically manage this crisis and prevent it from triggering a military conflict on the Korean peninsula.

Kim Calls the Shots

Foreign Policy (April 2009)

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Is North Korea dictating U.S. security policy in Northeast Asia? As Pyongyang ratchets up tensions in the region on a near-daily basis, now preparing for a rocket launch, it is a fair question. The Obama administration appears to be merely reacting, allowing events to move from bad to worse. The offensive plays all seem to be coming from North Korea’s side as the failed state misguidedly uses its brinkmanship tactics to gain international attention and maximize its negotiating leverage.